Frequently Asked Questions

This list is just a guide and is not exhaustive. If in doubt as to your suitability for treatment please contact us and just ask.

What do you treat?
How long does a consultation last?
What happens on my first visit?
How much do you charge?
What should I bring with me on my first visit?
Can I bring someone with me?
How many treatments will I need?
Can I be treated if I'm pregnant?
Should I take pain killers?
Is the clinic accessible for people with disabilities?
What training do Osteopaths have?
Whats the difference between an Osteopath and a Chiropractor?
Where can I find out more about Osteopathy?

What do you treat?
We treat people with:

  • Acute low back pain
  • Chronic low back pain
  • Sciatica
  • Neck pain and mid back pain
  • Shoulder and elbow pain
  • Frozen shoulder
  • Joint pain
  • Headaches arising from neck pain
  • Arthritic pain
  • Osteoarthritis in hips and Knees (in conjunction with your GP)
  • Muscle spasm
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Neuralgia
  • Sports injuries of a minor nature
  • Generalised aches and pains

This list is just a guide and is not exhaustive. If in doubt as to your suitability for treatment please contact us and just ask!

How long does a consultation last?
The consultation lasts half an hour.

What happens on my first visit?
On your first visit you will be listened to and asked questions about the problem you are experiencing. You will also be asked questions about your general health and other medical care you are currently receiving. You may also be asked about any medication that you are taking, your previous medical history, as well as your work, hobbies.

It is then likely that you will be asked to remove some clothing to allow the osteopath to carry out an examination. If you are uncomfortable with this in any way then please say so. We are happy to provide a gown and to leave the room as you undress and dress. We aim to understand the cause of your symptoms and ensure it is appropriate for us to treat and is not the result of a condition that might be better attended to by your GP.

Once a DIAGNOSIS has been reached, your osteopath will explain what they have found and discuss a plan of action. This may include exercises and/or lifestyle changes. At this stage we will discuss the likely time scale for recovery and the approximate number of treatments this might involve.

How much do you charge?
The cost of the initial consultation and any subsequent treatments is £37/session. You can pay with cash, credit card, debit card or cheque, and receipts can be provided for any insurance cover you may have.

What should I bring with me on my first visit?
On your first visit please bring with you details of any medications that you are currently taking and if you have recently undergone any medical tests any information regarding the outcome. This is particularly the case if the test were directly related to the problem that you are coming to see us about such as an MRI scan report or blood test results. You GP is normally happy to provide you with a copy of any results to bring with you.

Can I bring someone with me?
Absolutely! Please feel free to bring along a friend or family member who is more than welcome to join you in the treatment room for the entire consultation.

How many treatments will I need?
This very much depends on the problem but generally at the first consultation we will try to give an accurate estimate of the number of sessions we think will be required to see significant improvement. We will always discuss at each treatment how we and you feel things are progressing and keep both diagnosis and prognosis under constant review.

Can I be treated if I'm pregnant?
Yes. Very many women suffer a significant amount of pain and discomfort during pregnancy due to the rapid changes and increased stresses on their bodies as the baby grows. Osteopathy can certainly help to make pregnancy more comfortable. However its important that you tell us if you think you may have recently become pregnant or are in the first trimester (about 12 weeks). Most women are aware of the naturally high rate of miscarriage during the first twelve weeks or so of pregnancy and whilst there is no proven link between increased rates of miscarriage following osteopathic treatment, osteopaths are very selective with their techniques and do not manipulate the lower back or pelvis until beyond the first trimester.

Should I take pain killers?
Many patients are worried about taking pain killers for fear of masking the symptoms and injuring themselves further. This is unlikely and the most likely consequence of taking medication of this sort is that it will 'take the edge' of the pain and allow you to function a little more easily. Pain killers and anti-inflamatories can be especially useful in the acute stages of an injury. In longer term pain their benefits are less clear. There is no need to stop taking you pain medication before you see an osteopath.

Is the clinic accessible for people with disabilities?
Yes. We have wheelchair access and a toilet suitable for people with disabilities.

What training do Osteopaths have?
Undergraduate students follow a four or five-year degree course combining academic and clinical work. Qualification generally takes the form of a bachelor's degree in osteopathy - a BSc(Hons), BOst or BOstMed - or a masters degree in osteopathy (MOst). Many osteopaths continue their studies after graduating.

Osteopaths are required to update their training throughout their working lives. They must complete at least 30 hours of continuous professional development every year.

Whats the difference between an Osteopath and a Chiropractor?
This is very much a grey area and seemingly has been since the beginning of the professions. In general terms it's often said that chiropractors manipulate more than osteopaths and osteopaths perform more soft tissue work (massage) than chiropractors. However, this depends very much on the individual practitioner as some osteopaths will manipulate more frequently than others and equally some chiropractors will do significant amounts of soft tissue massage.

Again as a general rule osteopath's appointments tend to be longer (usually 30 mins) and involve a greater range of techniques, whereas chiropractic appointments tend to be shorter (10-15 mins) and involve more specific spinal adjustments.

Where can I find out more about Osteopathy?
Perhaps the most helpful website is the General Osteopathic Council at www.osteopathy.org.uk which is the statutory body that governs the profession in the UK. Another good source of information is the Institute of Osteopathy at www.osteopathy.org

(Please be aware that is you search for the term osteopath and read a site in the USA then osteopaths are part of the American Medical Association and are qualified medical doctors).